‘Super’ market stroll


Downtown Farmers Market kicks off season of produce and goods

By Melanie Yingst - [email protected]



Anthony Weber | Troy Daily News A crowd filled the streets on South Cherry Street Saturday in downtown Troy during the kick-off of the Downtown Troy Farmers Market. Here a group of sisters including from left are, Joyce Maugans along with her dog, Milo, of Carlisle, Linda Pressel, of Florida, Peggy Supinger, of Piqua, and Pat Roth, of Troy, were looking over works from Hepcatz including clay, glass, paint, beads and fabric. The sisters said they wanted to come downtown while spending the month together. The market will continue Saturdays through October 8, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.


TROY — The Downtown Troy Farmers Market had a warm welcome for its opening day Saturday.

Market manager Kelly Snyder said more than 500 people attended the market before noon.

“We have a really good mix this year,” Snyder said. “We could have not have asked for a better day. Everybody is out and they are excited because they look forward to this every year. There’s been a lot of traffic and from my count we’ve had more than 500 come through so far today.”

The market on Cherry Street will be open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday from June 11 through October 8.

New to the market this year is the addition of food trucks. The Tin Roof Mobile food truck will be the market’s anchor eatery each week on the corner of Main Street and Cherry Street. Snyder said the market will rotate a different food truck on the opposite end of the market. Kona Ice was serving up slushies and cold treats on Saturday to help cool down customers.

“It’s like a big street party every week,” Snyder said. She shared how families often stop at the many downtown restaurants and coffee houses before strolling the market for unique food, organic produce, crafts and live music to kick off their weekend.

The market also will feature extended hours this season. The market opens each Saturday at 9 a.m. and will remain open until 1 p.m.

“We added an hour and we also extended the season this year,” Snyder said. “We had farmers say they still had produce in the fall and wanted to go longer, so we got permission from the city to go three to four weeks longer.”

The market will feature 45 rotating vendors which will be part of the market line up through out the season. Local musicians will play to add to the street fair-like atmosphere.

“Before the farmers were even set up, people were up and ready to buy so they were ready to go so we are really excited to have everybody,” Snyder said.

Simple Living Farm of Piqua has been part of the downtown market for the last four years. Owners Mike and Becky Smith grow organic produce on their farm for markets and their CSA customers each year.

“We are certified naturally grown so we have a lot of customers here that are looking for organic typed foods,” Mike Smith shared. Smith shared how he grew up with gardening and wanted to offer healthy, local produce to others in the community.

The Smiths had greens, turnips, radishes for sale. The produce quickly disappeared late Saturday morning with the large turnout of the opening day.

“It’s been a good first day and we look forward to selling our food here each week,” Smith said.

Maci Krites, a sophomore student at Miami East High School, had her FFA project “Maci’s Weld Art” on display. Krites welded metal horseshoes in a variety of functional and artistic ways to sell as part of her FFA supervised agriculture experience.

“I have trivets to put plants or pots on and we have horseshoes as coat hooks to help hang your stuff,” Krites said. Maci’s Weld Art also features hand-welded horseshoes in shapes of crosses and Sheppard hooks for landscape decor.

“This is my first time at the market and we’ve had lots of people interested,” Krites said. Krites said she’ll be one of many FFA students selling their products at the market throughout the season. Krites said she’d be at the market the first Saturday of the month.

The market features fresh local produce, breads, artisan cheeses, maple syrup, honey, baked goods, locally-raised meat, artists’ booths, live music, other entertainment and more. The market is located on South Cherry Street, just off West Main Street.

For more information on the market and how to become a vendor, visit www.TroyMainStreet.org or call 339-5455.

The Downtown Troy Farmers Market is made possible through a grant from the General Fund of the Troy Foundation and the support of Alvetro Orthodontics and Unity National Bank. The market is organized, managed and promoted by Troy Main Street Inc.

Anthony Weber | Troy Daily News A crowd filled the streets on South Cherry Street Saturday in downtown Troy during the kick-off of the Downtown Troy Farmers Market. Here a group of sisters including from left are, Joyce Maugans along with her dog, Milo, of Carlisle, Linda Pressel, of Florida, Peggy Supinger, of Piqua, and Pat Roth, of Troy, were looking over works from Hepcatz including clay, glass, paint, beads and fabric. The sisters said they wanted to come downtown while spending the month together. The market will continue Saturdays through October 8, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
http://tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_160611aDw_Troy_Farmers_Market.jpgAnthony Weber | Troy Daily News A crowd filled the streets on South Cherry Street Saturday in downtown Troy during the kick-off of the Downtown Troy Farmers Market. Here a group of sisters including from left are, Joyce Maugans along with her dog, Milo, of Carlisle, Linda Pressel, of Florida, Peggy Supinger, of Piqua, and Pat Roth, of Troy, were looking over works from Hepcatz including clay, glass, paint, beads and fabric. The sisters said they wanted to come downtown while spending the month together. The market will continue Saturdays through October 8, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Downtown Farmers Market kicks off season of produce and goods

By Melanie Yingst

[email protected]

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