Editorial roundup

The Youngstown Vindicator, June 27

Little good can come from the geopolitical divorce of the century that played out last week in the United Kingdom when voters chose to sever their 43-year union with the bulk of the European continent.

The nasty separation bodes ill for Great Britain, the West and the world on economic, security, political and other fronts. For Americans, its adverse impact already has socked the U.S. financial markets and has potential to throw a dangerous curve ball into this year’s already topsy-turvy presidential election.

The decision by a narrow 52 percent to 48 percent majority of Britons last Thursday to break free of the 28-member-state European Union was fueled in large part by anger and frustration at the politics of the powerful international coalition representing 508 million people.

It wasn’t always that way. In 1973, Great Britain joined the European Economic Community, the forerunner of the EU that was created in 1957 as a means to muster up greater economic and political unity as a weapon to battle extreme nationalism that ravaged the continent during two 20th-century world wars. In recent years, however, nationalistic, isolationist and xenophobic currents increasingly have raised their ugly heads, fueling last week’s rupture…

Online: http://bit.ly/298nQow

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