Lost and found


Missing Springboro dog found on Troy farm

By Cecilia Fox - [email protected]



Provided photo Thorp helped Wilmington police officer Jerry Popp track down K-9 Karson last winter. Working together again for the first time since the Karson case, Popp joined Thorp on the stake-out for Tierney on Jan. 17.


Provided photo Jordina Thorp carefully harnesses Tierney, the Mastiff who went missing from his Springboro home last April. Tierney was tracked to Sunnybrook Training Center in Troy and successfully captured after multi-day stake-out earlier this month.


Provided photo Thorp often uses posters to raise awareness of lost dogs, asking people to call in with sightings and information. This dog, Buddy, was missing for several weeks before his capture.


Provided photo After he was caught on Jan. 17, Tierney enjoyed his first bath in nearly a year. The dog went missing from his Springboro home and was found on a farm in Troy.


Dedicated to helping dogs and their families

Professional dog tracker Jordina Thorp started down her unique career path when her own dog, a Welsh corgi named Andy, went missing several years ago. While Andy was never located, Thorp has dedicated her time to helping other families reconnect with their pets.

From this heartbreaking experience, Jordina learned the do’s and don’ts of searching for a lost dog.

Since starting her new career, Thorp has traveled the country finding lost dogs, from Alabama to New York and beyond. She’s famous in Ohio for locating the Wilmington Police Department’s K-9, Karson, last year after he’d been missing for 61 days.

When she is called in to assist in a search, Thorp will build a profile of the animal, with information including its breed, personality, the event surrounding its disappearance, and the surrounding area.

She then uses a variety of techniques to locate and catch each missing dog, including attraction, surveillance and various methods of trapping. Thorp calls on her years of experience and her profile of the missing animal to create a strategy that is individually tailored for each case.

For example, if a friendly young puppy were to go missing in a populated area, Thorp would likely launch a sign campaign and offer a reward, because it’s probable that someone picked the dog up.

This might not be true of dogs that are shy around people, like some recent rescue dogs, Thorp said. Often different breeds behave in predictable ways, she added.

One of Thorp’s most important tactics is to put up signs and get the word out on social media sites like Facebook.

“The most important thing to do when a dog goes missing is to be proactive, to get out and put signs up,” Thorp advises.

Then, working with information from tips and sightings, she will map out areas where the dog might be found.

In some cases, Thorp will set traps, which she monitors via a camera feed sent to her phone. She also has her own team of scent tracking dogs.

Thorp sometimes finds other roaming dogs while on cases. Often she is able to help those lost dogs as well, whether she locates an owner or a rescue to take the dog in.

“I’m always the girl who will stop when I see a loose dog to be sure it isn’t lost,” she said.

Thorp encourages pet owners not to give up on their missing dogs, even if they’ve been missing for weeks or months.

“We don’t give dogs enough credit,” she said.

She argues that stories like Karson’s and Tierney’s are not miraculous, they’re stories of perseverance.

“I hope that more people are less likely to think that it is impossible and less likely to give up,” Thorp said.

TROY — It took close to a year and one professional tracker to catch him, but a Springboro dog was finally returned his family earlier this month after being found on a farm in Troy.

After months of worrying, sleepless nights, and sightings that never led to capture, Mary Odeh was overjoyed to be reunited with her beloved dog, Tierney, a 6-year-old Mastiff.

Odeh spent nine months looking for Tierney, using social media to spread the word and get tips from people who had spotted him. The knowledge that he was still out there kept her going.

“I just really missed my dog,” she said.

The search came to an end on Jan. 17, when Tierney was finally captured by dog tracker Jordina Thorp of Lost Dog Tracking and Capture, who reunited missing K-9 Karson with the Wilmington Police Department last year.

“Tierney was a bit of a special case,” Thorp said, explaining that he had traveled quite a distance and had evaded capture several times.

Tierney roamed for months — from Springboro to Springfield to Troy and likely many other places in between — becoming more self-sufficient as time passed. Instead of looking to strange people for help, roaming dogs become expert survivalists, Thorp said.

Until December, there were no sightings of Tierney for several months. Odeh got close to catching him in July, but he’d become so used to being alone that he ran away again.

When the weather turned colder, Odeh got in touch with Thorp.

Thorp got involved in the case about a week before Christmas. Each case Thorp works on is different, and she builds an individualized plan to catch each dog based on what she knows about his personality and how he went missing.

For months, the skittish Mastiff had been scared further and further away from home by well-meaning groups of people looking for him. When Thorp got involved, she decided to keep the details of her plans to herself and a few helpers.

“Finally I said, ‘If we’re going to do this, we’re doing it my way,’” Thorp said. It was essential that the locations of Tierney’s sightings remain under wraps, she explained.

Unseen since the summer, Tierney arrived at Sunnybrook Training Center in Troy several weeks before his capture, said Noelle Mumpower-Davis, owner of the horse boarding and training facility.

She and her husband spotted a large dog out in their yard one morning, but didn’t think much of it because they’re no strangers to nearby animals visiting their farm.

“But around noon that day, someone came to the house with a poster asking if we’d seen this dog,” Mumpower-Davis said. “Apparently we were the first people to see him since August.”

When Tierney came back later the same day, Mumpower-Davis and her husband called the number on the poster and started working with Thorp to catch him.

Once he was spotted, it took weeks to actually capture Tierney. Thorp set up feeding stations and used cameras to keep an eye on spots Tierney might visit.

The farm owners put food out for weeks, even going so far as to cook steaks for him, to keep him coming back to their property. It was clear that Tierney enjoyed the free food supply, Thorp said, but, like most lost dogs, Tierney wasn’t willing to risk his security for food.

For fear of scaring Tierney away, the farm kept horses, people, and other animals out of certain areas until he was caught.

“It was quite a production,” Mumpower-Davis said. “But we all got really invested in him. Our boarders would ask about him and bring him treats.”

Keeping an eye on the area with cameras, Thorp learned that Tierney could be counted on to stop for lunch every day around the same time.

On that Sunday, Thorp was joined by K-9 Karson’s handler Officer Jerry Popp, working together for the first time since Karson was found.

They waited until Tierney — right on time for lunch — was distracted by a rotisserie chicken and made their move.

Tierney lost about 20 pounds and gained a large growth on his right front leg, but other than smelling “absolutely horrific,” he was in good condition, Thorp said.

When Odeh got the call that Tierney was safely caught, she was floored.

“It was like, what do I do?” Odeh said.

Tierney has been home now for two weeks and it is as if he never left, Odeh said.

“He does follow me around the house more now, which is sweet,” she said.

She thanked everyone involved in bringing Tierney home, including Thorp, Popp, the owners of Sunnybrook Training Center, and the many people on social media who followed the story and posted about sightings.

Provided photo Thorp helped Wilmington police officer Jerry Popp track down K-9 Karson last winter. Working together again for the first time since the Karson case, Popp joined Thorp on the stake-out for Tierney on Jan. 17.
http://tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_11351175_1456027914694936_6585375591654577728_n.jpgProvided photo Thorp helped Wilmington police officer Jerry Popp track down K-9 Karson last winter. Working together again for the first time since the Karson case, Popp joined Thorp on the stake-out for Tierney on Jan. 17.

Provided photo Jordina Thorp carefully harnesses Tierney, the Mastiff who went missing from his Springboro home last April. Tierney was tracked to Sunnybrook Training Center in Troy and successfully captured after multi-day stake-out earlier this month.
http://tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_12552563_1527652800865780_7530455706954176605_n.jpgProvided photo Jordina Thorp carefully harnesses Tierney, the Mastiff who went missing from his Springboro home last April. Tierney was tracked to Sunnybrook Training Center in Troy and successfully captured after multi-day stake-out earlier this month.

Provided photo Thorp often uses posters to raise awareness of lost dogs, asking people to call in with sightings and information. This dog, Buddy, was missing for several weeks before his capture.
http://tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_10609682_1523018651329195_7238398253364021365_n.jpgProvided photo Thorp often uses posters to raise awareness of lost dogs, asking people to call in with sightings and information. This dog, Buddy, was missing for several weeks before his capture.

Provided photo After he was caught on Jan. 17, Tierney enjoyed his first bath in nearly a year. The dog went missing from his Springboro home and was found on a farm in Troy.
http://tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_Untitled-2.jpgProvided photo After he was caught on Jan. 17, Tierney enjoyed his first bath in nearly a year. The dog went missing from his Springboro home and was found on a farm in Troy.
Missing Springboro dog found on Troy farm

By Cecilia Fox

[email protected]

Dedicated to helping dogs and their families

Professional dog tracker Jordina Thorp started down her unique career path when her own dog, a Welsh corgi named Andy, went missing several years ago. While Andy was never located, Thorp has dedicated her time to helping other families reconnect with their pets.

From this heartbreaking experience, Jordina learned the do’s and don’ts of searching for a lost dog.

Since starting her new career, Thorp has traveled the country finding lost dogs, from Alabama to New York and beyond. She’s famous in Ohio for locating the Wilmington Police Department’s K-9, Karson, last year after he’d been missing for 61 days.

When she is called in to assist in a search, Thorp will build a profile of the animal, with information including its breed, personality, the event surrounding its disappearance, and the surrounding area.

She then uses a variety of techniques to locate and catch each missing dog, including attraction, surveillance and various methods of trapping. Thorp calls on her years of experience and her profile of the missing animal to create a strategy that is individually tailored for each case.

For example, if a friendly young puppy were to go missing in a populated area, Thorp would likely launch a sign campaign and offer a reward, because it’s probable that someone picked the dog up.

This might not be true of dogs that are shy around people, like some recent rescue dogs, Thorp said. Often different breeds behave in predictable ways, she added.

One of Thorp’s most important tactics is to put up signs and get the word out on social media sites like Facebook.

“The most important thing to do when a dog goes missing is to be proactive, to get out and put signs up,” Thorp advises.

Then, working with information from tips and sightings, she will map out areas where the dog might be found.

In some cases, Thorp will set traps, which she monitors via a camera feed sent to her phone. She also has her own team of scent tracking dogs.

Thorp sometimes finds other roaming dogs while on cases. Often she is able to help those lost dogs as well, whether she locates an owner or a rescue to take the dog in.

“I’m always the girl who will stop when I see a loose dog to be sure it isn’t lost,” she said.

Thorp encourages pet owners not to give up on their missing dogs, even if they’ve been missing for weeks or months.

“We don’t give dogs enough credit,” she said.

She argues that stories like Karson’s and Tierney’s are not miraculous, they’re stories of perseverance.

“I hope that more people are less likely to think that it is impossible and less likely to give up,” Thorp said.

Reach Cecilia Fox at [email protected] or at (937) 552-2205.

Reach Cecilia Fox at [email protected] or at (937) 552-2205.

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