Board to consider strip mine application


By Cecilia Fox - [email protected]



Anthony Weber | Troy Daily News “Stop the Pit” signs line the roadside in the area of Experiment Farm and Farrington roads protesting the proposed strip mine.


MIAMI COUNTY — On Oct. 27, the Board of Zoning Appeals will hold a public hearing to consider a limestone surface mine proposed for a property on Farrington Road.

The conditional use permit application was filed with the Miami County Planning and Zoning Department in late September. The application seeks approval to develop the 93-acre site for the extraction, processing, and sale of limestone products.

The appeals board will hear the application at 7 p.m. Oct. 27, in the Troy Junior High School cafeteria.

In March, the Miami County Commissioners approved a truck haul route for the proposed surface mine, as presented by the county engineer. State law required the county engineer’s office to recommend a truck haul route before an application for a conditional use permit could be filed with the county Board of Zoning Appeals.

The primary entrance would be located on the west side of Experiment Farm Road just south of Farrington Road. From there, trucks would head to Farrington Road, to County Road 25-A, and from there to Interstate 75.

At that meeting, neighboring property owners Phil Neal and Tom Hartzell spoke out against the development of a surface mining operation on the property, citing concerns about increased traffic and possible negative impacts on property values.

Signs reading “Stop The Pit” started showing up this spring along roads in the area.

According to the application, the company anticipates that the stripping would begin within a year after approval of all necessary permits.

Initially, the processing plant, stockpiles and buildings will be located on the eastern portion of the property, and approximately 26 acres of the western portion will be mined first.

Between 4.5 and 5 acres of land will be mined annually, the application states.

The company also estimates that approximately 100 trucks would leave the quarry during a normal operating day and approximately 200 trucks at the height of the construction season, according to the application submitted to the county.

“In short, Piqua Materials employs best mining practices and has a long-standing reputation for operating in a harmonious manner within its community,” the application reads.

Piqua Materials started mining limestone in 1865 and was a major supplier of materials used in buildings and churches in Piqua.

Anthony Weber | Troy Daily News “Stop the Pit” signs line the roadside in the area of Experiment Farm and Farrington roads protesting the proposed strip mine.
http://tdn-net.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/web1_161014AW_PIT.jpgAnthony Weber | Troy Daily News “Stop the Pit” signs line the roadside in the area of Experiment Farm and Farrington roads protesting the proposed strip mine.

By Cecilia Fox

[email protected]

Reach Cecilia Fox at [email protected]

Reach Cecilia Fox at [email protected]

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